Retirement Contribution Limit Changes for 2022

With inflation on the rise, the IRS increased the 2022 contribution limits for some retirement accounts. Although a 2021 Congressional report found that only about 8.5% of defined benefit plan participants and 4.7% of individual retirement account (IRA) holders max out their contributions each year, increasing the amount you put aside for retirement may help your financial independence.1 Here is what retirement savers need to know about the increases allowed in 2022. Changes to 401(k) Limits For 2022, the 401(k) limit for taxpayers under age 50 has increased by $1,000, to $20,500.2 Those age 50 and older may make another $6,500 “catch-up” contribution, for a total maximum contribution of $27,000. This contribution amount is individual, which means that a married couple may contribute a total of $41,000 to their 401(k)s plus $6,500 more for each person who is age 50 or older to a maximum of $54,000.1 Along with 401(k)s, this $20,500 contribution limit also applies to the 403(b), 457, and Thrift Savings plans available to government employees. No Changes to IRA Limits Though 401(k) limits increased, the IRS did not increase the contribution limits for traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs. These IRA limits remain the same, $6,000 for those age 49 and under and $7,000 for 50 and older.1 The deductibility of traditional IRA contributions depends on your household income, while your ability to contribute to a Roth IRA also depends on your income. And unlike the IRA contribution limits, these income thresholds have changed for 2022. For single taxpayers covered by a 401(k), 457, or another workplace retirement plan, a deduction of up to the $6,000 or $7,000 limit (age 50 or older) is available only if their

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How to Recognize and Protect Yourself Against Tax Identity Theft  

When you hear the term identity theft, the first thought that comes to mind may involve a data breach or opening a credit card in someone else’s name. But another common type of identity theft involves the use of someone’s Social Security number to unlawfully intercept their income tax refund. Unfortunately, this fraud often isn’t discovered until the victim tries to file their taxes. Instead of getting a quick refund, they may instead be facing a lengthy battle with the IRS. Below we discuss some common signs of tax identity theft and how to protect yourself. Guard Your Personal Information Tax identity thieves don’t need as much sensitive information as you might think. With little more than your full legal name and Social Security Number (SSN) ID thieves may be able to file a return using false income information to obtain a refund to which you’re not entitled. One of the keys to preventing this fraud is minimizing the number of people who have access to your SSN. Don’t provide your SSN to anyone over the phone, shred all documents containing this number (instead of throwing them away), and use multi-factor authentication to log into any online tax preparation accounts. Check Your Credit Regularly Although tax ID theft may not show up on your credit report, having other data breaches (like a stolen credit card number or accounts you don’t remember opening) may increase your risk of this type of theft. Looking over your free credit report occasionally or signing up for credit alerts may tip you off to any other data vulnerabilities you may have experienced. File Taxes Early When Possible The quickest way to thwart a tax identity

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Tax Prep Checklist: Everything You Need to Be Ready for Tax Season

Regardless of whether you prepare your taxes yourself or use a professional’s services, it’s a good idea to gather the information and documentation you need well in advance of your actual tax filing date. Below, we’ve listed some key information you need when preparing this year’s taxes. Your Personal Information The personal information you may need to file taxes may contain information from your prior year’s return, including: Your Social Security Number (SSN), along with SSNs for your spouse, if applicable, and any dependents Last year’s Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) if you’re e-filing your taxes and need to confirm your identity Any tax filing PIN you may have. Your Income Information Your tax return typically requires documentation for all the taxable income you received the previous year. W-2 forms 1099 forms 1099-MISC for contract employees 1099-K for those who receive payment through a third-party provider like Venmo or Paypal 1099-DIV for investment dividends 1099-INT for investment interest 1099-B for transactions handled by brokers Receipts, pay stubs, or any other documentation on income that isn’t otherwise reflected. Your Deduction Information Next, gather information on deductions that help reduce your overall tax burden. These include, but aren’t necessarily limited to: IRA and other retirement contributions Medical bills Property taxes Mortgage interest Educational expenses like college tuition or student loan payments State and local income taxes or sales taxes Charitable donations Dependent care expenses Classroom expenses (for teachers) There are other state-specific deductions that may apply to your situation. Your Tax Credit Information Credits may further decrease your tax burden. Unlike deductions, which may lower your taxable income, tax credits simply credit you a portion of what you’d otherwise owe. Some available tax credits

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Five New Year’s Resolutions for Those Nearing Retirement

Getting ready for retirement is both exciting and daunting. While you are likely looking forward to the enjoyment and relaxation that retirement may bring, you are also cautious about ensuring you have enough money to be able to retire in the comfort you anticipate. If your retirement years are on the horizon, below are a few new year’s resolutions that may help put you on track. 1. Add Funds to Your 401(k) and then to Your Individual Retirement Account Funding your 401(k) to the maximum limit means you take advantage of the maximum employer-matching contribution. The maximum employee contribution limit for 401(k) plans increases from $19,500 in 2021 to $20,500 in 2022.  If you are already maxing out contributions to your employer-sponsored 401(k), consider funding your individual retirement account (IRA) as well. You are permitted to have a 401(k) and an IRA; however, whether your contributions to your IRA are tax-deductible depends on your adjusted gross income. The IRS Publication 590-A, found on IRS.gov, shows how to calculate your deduction. For 2021 and 2022, the IRA contribution limits remain the same. All workers up to the age of 50 are able to make a regular contribution to their IRA of up to $6,000 per year. For those over the age of 50, the amount rises to $7,000, which is allowed as a catch-up contribution. If you have the means to add to your IRA each year, it is a great way to increase your account and build it up to your retirement date. 2. Run a Projection Analysis for Your Retirement Those dealing in the financial world run projections all of the time to help them stay on track and

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LPL Financial Research Outlook 2022: Passing the Baton

LPL Research Outlook 2022: Passing the Baton  is designed to help you navigate the risks and opportunities over the rest of 2021 and beyond. While the economy continues to move forward, we’re still feeling some aftershocks of COVID-19 and the Delta variant. At the same time, 2021 also saw a resurgence of activities we missed in 2020, and the S&P 500 Index continued to advance as corporate America faced these challenges with resiliency. With the U.S. economy reopened, the growth rate may peak in second quarter 2021, but there is still plenty of momentum left to extend above-average growth into 2022. Inflation must be closely watched, but LPL Research believes recent price pressures are transitory, and that the strong economic recovery may continue to drive strong earnings growth and support further gains for stocks in the second half of 2021. The strong economic recovery and potentially higher inflation expectations may help push interest rates higher and lead to flat or potentially negative core bond returns in the second half. We’ve had a hand up that has helped us through a period of unique economic challenges. In 2022, the economy may be ready for a handoff, back to a greater emphasis on the individual choices of households and business. How smoothly that handoff is executed may determine the course of the recovery. LPL Research’s Outlook 2022 is here to provide insight on the economy, stocks, and bonds and what may lie ahead for next year and beyond.   View the digital version: https://view.ceros.com/lpl/outlook2022/p/1         This material is for general information only and is not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. The economic forecasts may not

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3 Financial Moves to Consider Before Ringing in the New Year  

Although you don’t have to wait until January to begin working on your financial goals, a new year may bring a much-needed fresh start on your spending and saving goals. Read on for three financial moves you may want to consider before ringing in the New Year. Open a Health Savings Account (HSA) If you have a high-deductible health plan (HDHP), taking advantage of an HSA may provide you with one of the most tax-advantaged accounts available. As long as funds are spent on qualifying healthcare expenses, an HSA typically offers tax-free contributions, tax-free growth, and tax-free withdrawals. For 2022, you may be able to contribute up to $3,650 (if you have individual coverage) or $7,300 (if you have family coverage).1 These contribution limits increase by $1,000 for those who are age 55 or over, which means you may contribute $4,650 for individual coverage or $8,300 for family coverage. Decide Between a Traditional or a Roth IRA Even if you contribute to a 401(k) at work, individual retirement accounts (IRAs) offer some distinct advantages over an employer-sponsored 401(k). Not only are these accounts typically portable, allowing you to move them to the retirement custodian of your choice, but they may also serve as a rollover account for your old 401(k)s if you leave your employer. Like a 401(k), a traditional IRA allows you to deduct your contributions (if you don’t exceed certain income limits) from your taxable income, reducing your overall tax bill. When you withdraw IRA funds in retirement, you typically pay taxes on them then. A Roth IRA, on the other hand, allows you to make post-tax contributions and then withdraw them tax-free in retirement. Get a Quote on Refinancing Your

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Retirement Mistakes to Fix Before the Holidays

Spend as much time fixing your mistakes as you do planning the holidays You probably spend more time planning your holiday gathering than preparing for your golden years. As a result, you make basic mistakes in trying to fund your retirement. Here are a few of the top mistakes people make to screw up this potentially crucial saving. No specific goal. Many people say something like, “I want to retire in my 60s.” Fine – but pinpointing the age when you want to retire is not even half the process. Additional key questions: How much do you need to retire? How much have you saved? Will your investments get you enough income to meet your retirement goals? An example of a specific retirement goal: “I want to retire at 62 with $750,000 of investable assets that yield approximately $45,000 a year of income, including my pension and Social Security.” Consider focusing on desired rather than needed returns. Don’t obsess with how much your portfolio can make and what your friends make investing. How much return your portfolio generates may mean little. More important: Identify how much you need to make to live comfortably in retirement. How much income do you need each month to survive? To live as well as you do now, or better? How does your investment income compare with your other retirement income sources, such as pensions and Social Security? Stop focusing on the rumored 12% return that big-time investors claim to make and start focusing on what you may actually need. No portfolio review. When did you last open your account statement? When did you last sit down with your financial advisor and review your investments

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A Holiday Gift-Giving Guide

It’s December, and that means it’s crunch time for the gift-buying season. This year, a little thinking outside the box will go a long way toward putting a smile on loved ones’ faces. Whether you’re buying for friends or family, for now or later, you’ll be sure to find the perfect presents in this gift guide! THE COMFORT OF HOME Many of us have gotten accustomed to spending a lot more time at home this year—which is a welcome reality for some and a trying one for others. So make the stay-at-home environment happier for everyone with these ideas for creating enjoyable living spaces. Kitchen Perhaps not surprisingly, sales of foods like tomato sauce, oil, and cheese have skyrocketed this year. It’s a great time to send a friend or family member on a taste adventure with a sampler kit! Hot sauces are always a popular choice for the more daring, as are BBQ sauces and spices. For heartier selections, you can opt for meat-and-cheese baskets or even a vegan jerky sampler pack. Home Gym People are adjusting to working out more in the confines of their homes, even to the point of adding home gyms. So why not help these workout warriors with a perfect gift? Items as simple as exercise bands or hand weights are not only practical but also show that you support their effort to better themselves. Another great idea for the workout warrior in your life? Buying a gift pass or a trial subscription for an at-home fitness program. Living Areas Nothing beats the gift of coziness, especially in frequently used rooms. Throw pillows, pillow covers, and throw blankets are affordable options that can add

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What Issues Should You Consider Before the End of the Year?

During November and December, we want to help you spot planning opportunities that are very time sensitive. Perhaps you… Are considering making year-end gifts to charitable organizations or family members, and need to determine your optimal funding strategy; Are looking to reduce your income tax liability this year, and are seeking loss harvesting and income-reduction opportunities; or Wish to make a high-level survey of your financial picture, ensuring that you aren’t missing any windows of opportunity that close with the calendar year.   Whatever the case may be, the end of the year is an important time to adjust your planning to reflect the changes that are bound to take place in your life. Tracking numerous deadlines and avoiding missed planning opportunities can be challenging during these busy months. To help ensure that you remain on track, we have a checklist that outlines 18 time-sensitive considerations to guide your end-of-year review and tee up any adjustments for the coming year.   Download Our End of Year Checklist   While the checklist can help you spot good ways to identify all the different opportunities to consider, we are always available to meet with you to discuss your finances and goals, and to identify what the best opportunities are for you.       1-05210148

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Charitable Giving: Good for Your Heart and Your 1040!

It may be better to give than to receive, but it may be even better to give and see your generosity rewarded. Charitable giving can play a valuable role in your financial and tax strategies. A well-planned gift to charity could provide an income tax deduction and a reduction of estate taxes. Your donation could also help you maintain financial security, exercise control over assets both during your lifetime and after death, as well as provide for your heirs in the manner you choose. To accomplish all of these objectives, you need to develop a plan tailored to your individual circumstances. The following strategies can be used to create a giving plan that is both beneficial and appropriate for you. When planned properly, gifts of appreciated property to charity may allow you to avoid the capital gains tax you would have owed when the asset was sold and may also allow you to receive an income tax deduction, usually worth the fair market value (FMV) of the property. Also, by removing that asset from your estate, you may reduce your potential estate tax burden. If you wish to make a gift of property to a charity but also retain some control over it, a charitable remainder trust (CRT) may be an appropriate vehicle. A CRT might be effective when funded by an appreciating asset, such as real estate or stock in a family-owned business. After the property is transferred to the trust, the trust continues to provide income to the beneficiaries for a period of time, after which the remainder of the trust is donated to the charity. You could avoid capital gains taxes on the assets you donated, and

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